Fatty Meat vs. Lean Meat

There is clear science behind why fatty meats are better for you than lean meats; however, fatty meats have been so demonized that people, even on a low carb high fat diet, still gravitate toward lean meats. If you want optimal health and to not feel hungry on this WOE, then you must must must get “lean meat is good and fatty meat is bad” out of you head.

Here’s the scoop:

  1. Fat plays many important roles in the body: it allows vitamins and minerals into your cells, it keeps you full as it is very satiating, and most importantly, it has a very mild and delayed insulin release. So no huge spikes of insulin.
  2. Fatty meats have the protective barrier of fat so it slows down insulin release and since it is satiating, you won’t eat as much protein.
  3. Lean meats have no fat protective barriers. They are almost 100% protein. Protein breaks down as glucose in the body ( a process called Glucogenesis in which animal starch is turned into glycogen – what is not needed for the muscles will stay in the blood stream as glucose) just like carbs do. This causes almost as rapid an insulin release as carbs.
  4. For most of us on this WOE, we are insulin resistant. This means our bodies make insulin, but our insulin receptors are resistant, do not open up to let the glucose in and therefore most of our glucose gets stored as fat.
  5. If you eat lean cuts of meat, you make too much glucose, insulin cannot push through the glucose into the cells because of resistant receptors and you store the glucose as fat. This is the opposite of what we want our bodies to do on this WOE. We want to be fat burners, not store fat.

So the next time you are grocery shopping, do not fear those fatty cuts of meat. Buy fatty steaks, fatty hamburger, fatty pork, real bacon, dark meat poultry with the skin, and fatty fish. Your body will thank you!

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Frustration Abounds (Venting)

My little fiasco over the holiday has had enormous negative results. Prior to Thanksgiving, I had lost 19.5 lbs. I ate that small slice of pie and had to go back on the insulin to counteract it (and have remained on the insulin because my BGLs are all over the place again). As a result of the insulin, I have been craving food like crazy and even though I have stuck to eating only LCHF foods, the eating has been constant. I am hungry all the time, no matter how much fat I consume during the day instead of reaching for carby things or extra protein.

Today I weighed myself and the result of that pie and needing insulin again: a gain of 9 lbs. *headdesk* 9 lbs in 8 days. I am so pissed off at myself for eating that damn piece of pie. So pissed that I needed insulin again. So pissed that insulin makes me so damn hungry and I eat uncontrollably. I own up to the fact that I did this to my body… made it so damn insulin resistant… from years and years of eating crap and then eating the standard diabetic diet when I first found out I had diabetes. I wish I had learned about LCHF/Ketogenic eating back 20 years ago. I wish, I wish, I wish.

==end of venting rant==

Okay, so now that I know of the consequences, I know what taking insulin does to me, I know about the uncontrollable hunger, and I’ve owned up to my mistake and sufficiently berated myself for it, it’s time to move on. It’s time to go back on plan.

  • no more cheats
  • no more insulin
  • back to eating fats and moderate protein
  • no more carbs except the few in green veggies and avocados

I can do this!

 

56 Names of Sugar

sugar

And this doesn’t include sugar alcohols which most people consider safe for those seeking a sugar substitute besides aspartame and sucralose. They do contain trace amounts of carbohydrates, can cause all kinds of gastral problems and even stall weight loss in some people. The big question is: do sugar alcohols spike insulin? Not sure about that one as the debate is still out since they bypass the liver and are immediately absorbed. I cannot use them because of gastral issues, so I won’t be doing an n=1 experiment to find out.

Common Sugar Alcohols:

  • Sorbitol
  • Xylitol
  • Erythritol
  • Isomalt
  • Lactitol
  • Hydrogenated starch hydrolysates
  • Maltitol
  • Mannitol